I want to piggyback off Angela’s post from last week because I really like what she wrote about and I think it’s important. The two of us have very different schedules and yet I believe that budgeting our time is equally important to us both! For example, I know that I’m a little bit of a procrastinator when it comes to some things, so if I’m honest with myself and know that I will be easily distracted before or during my completion of a task, that makes me able to schedule my time more accurately. I tend to be optimistic right before leaving work or on the train home: I’m going to go home, do laundry, fold it, put it away, cook dinner from scratch, get some work done, etc. And then when I finally trudge through the door about an hour later, I’ve overwhelmed myself to the point where I don’t do anything.

It is so important to be realistic about your own expectations for yourself for the day, week, and month ahead if you plan your tasks. Am I really going to accomplish a long to-do list at work only to go home and accomplish another long to-do list? Probably not. That doesn’t mean that I can’t accomplish some of those items on my list during the week and complete the tasks over the course of a few days, though! Personally, the time that I feel the least productive and driven is the second I walk in the door from work. I don’t know if it’s because I’m finally home and I can relax or what, but I know that when I come home all I can do is make dinner and eat it. And really, that’s fair–I am allowed to feel a bit drained and to need some alone time after my day. Being honest with myself about how I know I’m going to feel will help me decide what I can accomplish later in the evening.

I’m glad that Angela wrote about her schedule, making time for her own personal projects, and how it’s okay to take the time to figure out a schedule that works best for her. It’s so true! If we can’t be honest with ourselves about we spend our time, how can we possibly plan anything?

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