Archives for posts with tag: career

Recently, my company decided to let us work from home one day per week. Before, we had 12 work from home days to use for the year, but that didn’t feel like quite enough (especially in the winter with all the bad weather!). When the email was sent out, everybody was audibly excited. I can’t describe how much easier this makes my life and how grateful I am to my company for taking its employees concerns and requests seriously.

I’m not at all thinking about looking for a new job, but this new policy cements my desire to stay at this company even more. I know I’ve talked before about the importance of feeling appreciated at work, and my company truly makes me feel that way. I think it’s so important for office morale to not only ask for your employees’ opinions, but to really listen to them. For example, at the start of my first two performance review discussions with my manager, I remember him asking how I was doing and if I was happy at this company and in my job. That meant so much to me and I’m so thankful that I have a manager like that.

I know it’s easy for me to say because I’m happy in my current role, but if you feel unhappy, dissatisfied, or underappreciated in your career or are just itching for something new–don’t hesitate! I’m glad I didn’t hesitate almost 3 years ago when I took this job. A successful career is all about taking risks (or at least, that’s what I hear from those who actually have an established career!) and I’m inclined to follow that advice because I know more people who are happy in their careers than who aren’t.

What about all our readers out there? Do you have any stories about a risk you took in your career and how it worked out for you?

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Ah, finally–the nice weather seems to be slowly creeping back into the north east! I hope it sticks around this time….

I may have written about this topic before (or something similar), but I wanted to touch on the importance of helping others, especially in the context of your professional life. In my office, we have a department-wide coverage initiative, meaning that when someone is out for a length of time, their work will not go undone. And the person (or people) who are taking over their tasks won’t be confused because of the way we organize our documents. It sounds like a simple thing, but it is truly life-changing; when I went to Ireland for 2 weeks, having that help was invaluable. I didn’t stress out while I was gone and once I was back, it was easy to slip right back into the flow of things. This is why, depending on my to-do list for that week, I try to help out my coworkers as much as possible.

I believe in karma, maybe not in the truly traditional way, but in way–I believe that what you put out there, you get back. If I reach out and help when I’m able, then people will want to do the same for me. It’s so important, I think, for everyone to have this attitude because sometimes what may seem like a small task to you could actually be a huge help to someone else. I don’t like to leave anyone hanging if I have the extra time or if adding in one or two additional tasks won’t break my day. So, be good to your colleagues–it will make you feel good and they’ll certainly appreciate it :).

Does anyone else live by this rule where you work?

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This week has been so busy! I can’t believe March is already half over–the days have been flying by. Today, I have a group meeting to discuss certain tasks that are unique to our jobs and how long those tasks take us to complete. This is to determine whether some tasks are essential or not, as well as which ones can be standardized across the board or are more unique to a certain publication.

One of the things I really like about the company I work for is the opportunity to get involved in projects (both long- and short-term) that help to make employees’ jobs easier. Several time-saving initiatives have been rolled out just within the past few months that have positively impacted how I do my job. To be able to see concrete results from projects that I’m involved with has been an amazing morale-booster. I know that I’m directly contributing not only to the company, but to my colleagues directly.

There is something to be said about getting involved, whether it’s at your job, school, or in your community. As you long-time readers know, I’m a naturally shy person that doesn’t like to call too much attention to myself, but these various opportunities to get involved at work have started me down the path of confidence. I may not be ready to give a presentation to a room full of people at a moment’s notice, but I’m certainly feeling much better in terms of how I handle myself in front of a crowd.

There’s something exciting about where I am in my life today–I feel like the best parts are yet to come and that I’m on exactly the path I need to be to make those things happen. I’m just feeling optimistic these days :).

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I have been swamped at work lately! It’s been going well, though; I’d much rather be busy than bored. My new assignment is working out and everything is starting to come together. I’m getting myself organized and I’m starting to feel like I’m swimming instead of slipping underwater! The longer I work in the academic publishing field, the more I realize how important organization is to me, not only in my career but in my personal life.

One of the things I started doing almost every weeknight for the past year or so is laying out my clothes the night before work. I can’t tell you how much of a difference this makes in my morning–I’m less stressed because I already know what I’m wearing that day. Because it makes my life so much easier, I’ve been forcing myself to do this every weeknight so that I can save time getting ready in the morning and face my day with little to no pre-stress!

I also do the same thing with food, though this is less strict for me. I try to plan my meals ahead of time when I go food shopping, and then figure out my week based on my meals once I get home. I don’t know about you, but I’m at my most cranky at the end of the day when I walk in the door after work. I’m tired, I’m trying to de-stress, and I’m thinking about everything I still need to do before the day is over. Oh, and I’m usually starving. The last thing I want to think about is preparing an elaborate meal for myself, so I make sure that I’ve prepared the night before or that morning. I’ve either defrosted something, food is waiting for me in the crock pot, or I have some sort of plan for dinner. This also prevents me from overeating and staying healthy.

I remove clutter from surfaces I use all the time, such as my coffee table and bedroom dresser (and floor…). I hate clutter–it puts me in a frame of mind that I don’t like, so I’ve been trying to be more minimalist with my things recently. I don’t know if the open floor plan at work is seeping into my home life, but the lack of stuff is one of the things I like the most about our office. It’s much harder for someone to keep too much with them all day since they have to lug it around and put it away at the end of the day.

I’ve found that the more I organize things to suit my needs, the happier, calmer, and more productive I am. What I outlined above doesn’t work for everyone (I know–one of my closest friends swears she actually thinks more clearly when she’s surrounded by her work), but work out a system for your life. It helps!

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