Archives for posts with tag: career

Well, ladies and gents, I’m here! I finally made it to Ireland. We just flew in this morning and I was able to get a nap in this afternoon, thankfully. I wasn’t able to sleep on the plane at all! The past few days have been a whirlwind for me at work-I’ve been preparing for this trip for some time, but there is only so much I could do at work to plan what would come up in my absence. Luckily, my company has some wonderful procedures for vacation coverage.

I know exactly who will work on which tasks for my journals while I’m out, which was great for planning. It made my editorial offices feel better to know there is a specific contact person for them while I’m gone, just in case of emergency. It’s helpful for me as well, because I don’t have to come back to a mound of work that hasn’t been touched since I left. I’m so glad I was able to plan for this trip early enough that my editorial offices, colleagues, and I felt comfortable with my vacation.

Now, I’m off to enjoy myself (and to drive on the other side of the road! Wish me luck!). I’ll write again in June!

I’ve been thinking about my job a lot recently and how so much of it depends on talking to people all day. I speak to my editorial offices (mostly via email, but also on the phone), both internal and external colleagues, and authors constantly. I’m a shy (less so than I used to be), mostly quiet person and I remember wanting to pursue a career where I could get out of comfort zone a little, but not too much! Ironically, I chose a career in publishing that requires me to speak to people for most of my day. This communication, both professional and personal, helps maintain relationships in and out of work that can only benefit me in the long run.

I can speak with someone on the phone, answer an email, and talk to a colleague all within the span of 10 minutes while at work, but I don’t feel burnt out from doing this. Surprisingly, it tends to energize me! Staying close with my colleagues and my editorial offices has made a huge difference in the way I work. I could come in, do my job, and leave without cultivating any relationships whatsoever (it might be difficult, but I could do it). Not only would this be so unbelievably boring that I can’t imagine doing it, it would also be unwise for me to miss these opportunities. Every time I solve a problem an author is having via email or speak to one of my managing editors on the phone, I’m developing my interpersonal skills and preparing myself for the rest of my career. “Interpersonal skills” sounds like such a generic term, but these skills are very real and necessary. If I can’t communicate effectively with those around me at work, I will make my life (and theirs) much harder.

I’m a naturally introverted person and when I come home after work or a day spent with people, I tend to need to decompress for awhile and “rest,” so to speak. I sit in silence and do something by myself, such as read, watch TV, or engage in one of my hobbies, and this centers me and makes me feel more myself. That’s okay, especially after a long day! It prepares me for the next day where I will have to speak with many different kinds of people about a variety of topics, and I feel powerful because I can have a positive impact on someone else’s day.

Does your job or the classes you take in school require you to constantly communicate with people? How do you feel about it?

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I’m not sure if I’ve mentioned this on the blog yet, but at the end of May until the very beginning of June I’ll be taking a trip to Ireland! I’m going with my grandmother and we’ll be driving (okay, I’ll be driving…) around the country. I cannot wait for this trip–I’ve been saving and planning for it for awhile now and it’s so close! I’ve also been planning for it at work and it will be the first major vacation I’ve taken since a week-long trip to Aruba in 2014. This trip to Ireland will be almost 2 whole weeks (luckily, Memorial Day is thrown in there and my office is closed) and I have to prepare for people to take over my work while I’m out. Here are my plans:

  1. Do as much work as possible before I leave. This is very important because I don’t want to leave a pile of unfinished article proofs or unreviewed copyediting for someone to deal with while I’m out. I want to be conscientious and make sure I don’t overwhelm anyone.
  2. Anticipate any problems that could arise while I’m out. Since I’ll be “working ahead” as much as possible before I leave, it will give me a chance to think about problems or questions that could arise from my editorial offices. If I can anticipate their needs, I can head any potential issues off at the pass so my coverage partners only deal with happy, satisfied people.
  3. Make sure everything for both of my journals is organized. I’m a pretty organized person as it is, but making sure the things that my partners will be working on are in order before I leave will help them immensely. There are a lot of coverage documents for our journals and I may have let mine get a little stale, so I’m planning on looking through those and updating all the information.
  4. Bring home little thank-you treats for my lovely coverage partners! I’ve covered for a few people during my time here and I always appreciated the nice in-person “thank you” or small gift of chocolate, etc. This is certainly not required, but I’d like to make sure the people who are helping me out feel that I really appreciate what they’re doing!

As my departure date gets closer I’m sure I’ll have more to add to this list, but for now I’m concentrating on these items to ensure my vacation goes smoothly for everyone! How about you, readers–what was the longest vacation you took from work or school and how did you handle coverage or the workload while you were out?

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Courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Flickr.

There are a lot of changes coming to my office in the coming months. I will talk more specifically about them as the plans become more concrete, but I wanted to write this sort of introductory post to work through some things in my mind.

I don’t like change.

There, I said it. I’m sure many of you reading this right now can relate to me and how I feel; really, in the grand scheme of things, who continually welcomes and enjoys change? Some people do, I’m sure, and I think those people are superstars. How amazing it must be to be so open to adjusting the way you do something or operate in the world!

I’m not like that. I’m reluctant to accept most changes and then I get a little cranky when they happen (because that’s mature and I’m a grown-up lady…). When these big changes were first announced for my office location, I initially when through some of the five stages of grief: denial (oh, for sure), anger (yes, oh yes), bargaining, depression, and acceptance. I think I’m still hovering somewhere in anger and maybe a little in depression? I don’t want you to think that I’m unable to function throughout the course of my day because I’m thinking ahead and planning the ultimate destruction of my way of life (that’s entirely too dramatic and I’d like to think I haven’t gotten to that level yet!), but I am having some trouble accepting that these things are going to happen.

I like routine and knowing what to expect. Sure, I enjoy a good surprise every now and then, but for the every day tasks in my job, I like a bit of order. Now, I know that order will be interrupted and it’s scaring me a little. I’m nervous admitting to this because, to me, it seems like weakness, but I think it’s important for me to write about it. I know others have/had/will have the same thoughts I do about change and I want to be honest about how I’m feeling.

I think the biggest aspect of all this upcoming change that I keep reminding myself about is this: I will be able to settle down into a new routine. My life will not turn into chaos and anarchy–I can survive and thrive, even after this change takes place! Even if I have to remind myself of this every day, multiple times a day, that will be okay. Because it’s important for me to stay positive throughout this time of change.

How about you, readers–have you gone through a big change in your work or personal life that required some “coaching” to get through it?

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