Archives for posts with tag: personal

I want to piggyback off Angela’s post from last week because I really like what she wrote about and I think it’s important. The two of us have very different schedules and yet I believe that budgeting our time is equally important to us both! For example, I know that I’m a little bit of a procrastinator when it comes to some things, so if I’m honest with myself and know that I will be easily distracted before or during my completion of a task, that makes me able to schedule my time more accurately. I tend to be optimistic right before leaving work or on the train home: I’m going to go home, do laundry, fold it, put it away, cook dinner from scratch, get some work done, etc. And then when I finally trudge through the door about an hour later, I’ve overwhelmed myself to the point where I don’t do anything.

It is so important to be realistic about your own expectations for yourself for the day, week, and month ahead if you plan your tasks. Am I really going to accomplish a long to-do list at work only to go home and accomplish another long to-do list? Probably not. That doesn’t mean that I can’t accomplish some of those items on my list during the week and complete the tasks over the course of a few days, though! Personally, the time that I feel the least productive and driven is the second I walk in the door from work. I don’t know if it’s because I’m finally home and I can relax or what, but I know that when I come home all I can do is make dinner and eat it. And really, that’s fair–I am allowed to feel a bit drained and to need some alone time after my day. Being honest with myself about how I know I’m going to feel will help me decide what I can accomplish later in the evening.

I’m glad that Angela wrote about her schedule, making time for her own personal projects, and how it’s okay to take the time to figure out a schedule that works best for her. It’s so true! If we can’t be honest with ourselves about we spend our time, how can we possibly plan anything?

4972420374_fe6a7f2297_z
Source.

Advertisements

It’s so important to ask questions. I wanted to write about this topic today because I find that the more experienced I become in my field, the more questions I have about various aspects of it. This is a good thing; I think there is a misconception in our society that a person who asks a lot of questions must not “get it.” That just isn’t true! I think that asking questions shows a person is actively thinking about a topic and exploring many facets of a problem. At least, that’s what I experience when I come up with questions about something. I want to know more and the best way to obtain information is to ask specific, direct questions about it.

When I have questions to ask someone, whether it is an author, my editorial office, or my manager, I make sure that I combine all of my questions into one email, phone call, or meeting with that person. There is nothing more irritating than receiving several emails or phone calls about the same topic when one well-organized message would have sufficed. Also, it helps to take a moment and really think through what it is you want to ask; sometimes the answer is right in front of you, figuratively speaking, and all it takes is a minute of contemplation to find it. Or, on the other hand, maybe after that contemplation you’ve considered a new way in which to ask a question or think about a problem. I can sometimes power through things and have learned to ease off the gas and not fire off an email or phone call the second I have questions. This has made me a more careful, controlled person and I feel more confident in my problem-solving abilities.

Don’t ever feel like you are less-than just because you want to ask questions. Sometimes asking a question can start a conversation or debate that could create some amazing answers. I’m a naturally shy person and I am only just now becoming comfortable with asking questions (lots of them, if I need to!) and I wish I had overcome my fears before this point. Gather your courage, confidence, and intelligence, get out there, and ask questions! 🙂

6107062655_61eba7be5f_o
Source.

Well, ladies and gents, I’m here! I finally made it to Ireland. We just flew in this morning and I was able to get a nap in this afternoon, thankfully. I wasn’t able to sleep on the plane at all! The past few days have been a whirlwind for me at work-I’ve been preparing for this trip for some time, but there is only so much I could do at work to plan what would come up in my absence. Luckily, my company has some wonderful procedures for vacation coverage.

I know exactly who will work on which tasks for my journals while I’m out, which was great for planning. It made my editorial offices feel better to know there is a specific contact person for them while I’m gone, just in case of emergency. It’s helpful for me as well, because I don’t have to come back to a mound of work that hasn’t been touched since I left. I’m so glad I was able to plan for this trip early enough that my editorial offices, colleagues, and I felt comfortable with my vacation.

Now, I’m off to enjoy myself (and to drive on the other side of the road! Wish me luck!). I’ll write again in June!

I’ve been thinking about my job a lot recently and how so much of it depends on talking to people all day. I speak to my editorial offices (mostly via email, but also on the phone), both internal and external colleagues, and authors constantly. I’m a shy (less so than I used to be), mostly quiet person and I remember wanting to pursue a career where I could get out of comfort zone a little, but not too much! Ironically, I chose a career in publishing that requires me to speak to people for most of my day. This communication, both professional and personal, helps maintain relationships in and out of work that can only benefit me in the long run.

I can speak with someone on the phone, answer an email, and talk to a colleague all within the span of 10 minutes while at work, but I don’t feel burnt out from doing this. Surprisingly, it tends to energize me! Staying close with my colleagues and my editorial offices has made a huge difference in the way I work. I could come in, do my job, and leave without cultivating any relationships whatsoever (it might be difficult, but I could do it). Not only would this be so unbelievably boring that I can’t imagine doing it, it would also be unwise for me to miss these opportunities. Every time I solve a problem an author is having via email or speak to one of my managing editors on the phone, I’m developing my interpersonal skills and preparing myself for the rest of my career. “Interpersonal skills” sounds like such a generic term, but these skills are very real and necessary. If I can’t communicate effectively with those around me at work, I will make my life (and theirs) much harder.

I’m a naturally introverted person and when I come home after work or a day spent with people, I tend to need to decompress for awhile and “rest,” so to speak. I sit in silence and do something by myself, such as read, watch TV, or engage in one of my hobbies, and this centers me and makes me feel more myself. That’s okay, especially after a long day! It prepares me for the next day where I will have to speak with many different kinds of people about a variety of topics, and I feel powerful because I can have a positive impact on someone else’s day.

Does your job or the classes you take in school require you to constantly communicate with people? How do you feel about it?

 1459055735_8121219fb4_o
Source.

%d bloggers like this: